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Federation of State Medical Boards Releases Model Legislation to Expedite Physician Licensure in Lieu of Telemedicine Push

As the demand for telemedicine increases across the country, states continue to grapple with licensure issues arising from physicians working across state lines. In an effort to resolve the dilemma, the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) published model legislation designed to assist in the implementation of a multistate compact, by which physicians from one state can be expeditiously licensed in another state to practice telemedicine.

FSMB’s model legislation requires a minimum of seven states to participate, with each state providing representatives for a governing commission. When at least seven states have joined, the commission would openly share disciplinary and credentialing information in a joint effort to quickly license physicians that are already licensed in one of the other participating states. This sharing of information would allow the participating states to license physicians without being saddled with the responsibility of independently collecting the large amount of paperwork required to license a physician. The governing commission of the compact would not have any licensing power itself, but rather would serve to facilitate the quick transfer of information between participating states. As an example, if Illinois, Michigan, and Indiana joined the multi-state compact, a physician licensed in Michigan, wishing to practice telemedicine in Illinois and Indiana, would have the compact commissioner obtain the necessary credentialing information and approval from the Michigan medical board, collect the licensing fees mandated in Illinois and Indiana, and then process an expedited license.

Members of the FSMB are hopeful for support of their model legislation because it ensures that licensure remains a state right and avoids federal intervention. A multi-state compact will hopefully solve the licensure dilemma, allowing physicians, for example, to use telemedicine technologies to offer specialized care to rural communities. One such state is Wyoming, which relies on telemedicine to care for its residents. The Executive Director of the Wyoming State Board of Medicine, Kevin Bohnenblust, stated that Wyoming has approximately 3,000 licensed physicians, but only 1,200 physicians that actually live in the state. As a prominent “importer” of telemedicine, Wyoming is hopeful that the FSMB policy takes effect. Bohnenblust also notes that states with renowned hospitals like Michigan, Minnesota, and Ohio, could benefit as “exporters” of telemedicine.

Although there are few opponents of the FSMB model legislation, some are leery of establishing new governmental organizations. However, FSMB has considerable support from the American Medical Association, which recently stated that the multi-state compact legislation aligns with their efforts to modernize state licensure frameworks.

As previously addressed on this blog, with the release of the model legislation, FSMB continues to be a strong supporter of integrating telemedicine practices across state lines. Providers interested in introducing telemedicine technologies into their practices should review state licensure laws, as well as any Fraud & Abuse issues that may arise from adding a new line of business to their practice. If you or your healthcare entity needs guidance regarding the practice of telemedicine, please contact a Wachler & Associates attorney by phone at 248-544-0888 or via email at wapc@wachler.com. Our firm will continue to keep you up to date on legislative developments applicable to telemedicine, as well as all other healthcare law news. If interested, please subscribe to Wachler & Associates’ health law blog by adding your email address and clicking “Subscribe” in the window on the top right of this page.