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FDA Gives Finalized Guidance on Medical Device Data Systems, Mobile Apps, and Medical Image Storage and Communications Devices

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued non-binding guidance on February 9, 2015 finalizing its position on regulatory compliance of medical device data systems (MDDS), medical image storage and communications devices and mobile medical applications. In its recently issued guidance, the FDA explained that it will not enforce compliance with the regulatory controls that apply to MDDS, medical image storage devices and medical image communications devices because the devices pose a low risk to the patients and play an important role in the advancement of digital health care. Under FDA regulations, MDDS is defined as hardware or software that electronically transfers or stores medical device data, electronically converts medical device data from one format to another, or electronically displays medical device data. A medical image storage device stores and retrieves medical images and a medical image communication device electronically transfers medical image data between medical devices.

As a result of the FDA’s position, manufacturers of MDDS or medical storage and communication devices will not have to register with the FDA, submit to pre-market review or post-market reporting, and can avoid quality system regulation, thereby saving manufacturers time and money. The FDA further stated that it will not enforce compliance with pre-market notification for MDDS, or medical image storage and communication devices that would have otherwise required such notification under the regulations.

Additionally, on February 9, 2015 the FDA issued non-binding guidance specific to mobile apps. The issued guidance contains three appendices that explain and provide examples of apps that are within FDA enforcement, outside of FDA enforcement, and those over which the FDA abstains from enforcing the regulations. The first appendix gives examples of apps that are not “devices” under FDA regulations; the second appendix gives examples of apps that may meet the definition of “device,” but but regulations will not be enforced as the apps are considered low risk to patients and users; and the third appendix gives examples of what the FDA considers “mobile medical apps” over which the FDA does intend to enforce its regulations. The FDA defined “mobile medical apps” as apps that meet the definition of a “device” and are intended to be used as an accessory to a regulated device or are intended to transform a mobile platform into a device. In its guidance on mobile apps, the FDA stated many mobile devices do not fall under its definition of a “device” in 21 USC ยง 321(h) and are therefore not regulated by the FDA. The FDA did, however, strongly recommend that manufacturers of mobile apps that may qualify as a “device” follow the FDA’s Quality System regulation in developing and designing apps. Lastly, while the FDA acknowledged that many current mobile apps do not constitute “devices” under FDA regulations, or are simply not regulated by the FDA, current and new mobile medical devices are subject to FDA enforcement.

In sum, the dually issued FDA guidance on MDDS, medical image storage and communication devices, and mobile apps in large part constitutes an abstention on behalf of the FDA, perhaps signalizing the FDA’s recognition that strict enforcement of FDA regulations on MDDS, medical image storage and communication devices, and mobile apps will unduly burden manufacturers, slow the development of digital health care and fail to provide any greater protection to the public. However, mobile medical apps are subject to FDA regulation and enforcement and developers are encouraged to engage in open dialogue with the FDA to discuss potential regulatory requirements.

If you have any questions relating to MDDS, medical image storage and communication devices, or mobile application compliance with FDA regulations or any other compliance issues, please contact a Wachler & Associates attorney at 248-544-0888 or at wapc@wachler.com. For further updates on FDA regulatory requirements and other healthcare news, please subscribe to Wachler & Associates’ health law blog by adding your email address and clicking “Subscribe” in the window on the top right of this page.