Articles Posted in Affordable Care Act

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In November 2014, Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives circulated a “discussion draft,” which proposed significant reforms to the process by which Medicare reimburses hospitals for short stays. Perhaps most notably, the GOP proposal would eliminate the two-midnight rule. Since its enactment, the two-midnight rule has remained controversial among healthcare providers. Under the two-midnight rule, an admission is appropriate only when the patient remains in the hospital for two midnights. However, since its adoption, the rule has created confusion and elicited criticism from providers who claim that it undermines their clinical decision-making process. Acknowledging the issue, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) limited enforcement of the two-midnight rule and solicited stakeholders for suggestions on improving it.

The discussion draft also proposes the establishment of a new Medicare payment system for hospital stays. Under the proposal, the payment system would go into effect in fiscal year 2020 and unify the currently separate inpatient and outpatient payment systems. During the five years before the implementation, CMS would be tasked with developing a transitional, per-diem payment system for short-term hospital stays. Additionally, CMS would restrain Recovery Audit Contractors (RAC) until the new payment system is adopted. This reprieve is important when establishing a new payment system because of the RAC program’s onerous presence in the healthcare industry. Just last year, the RAC program recouped over $3 billion in Medicare overpayments, and audit appeals have created such a backlog that many appellants are waiting over three years for a decision. The backlog of appeals violates the statutory requirement for Administrative Law Judges to decide Medicare appeals within 90 days of the request for hearing.

Also included in the GOP’s discussion draft is a partial elimination of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) moratorium on the expansion of physician-owned hospitals. Currently, the law prohibits new physician-owned hospitals, expansion of existing physician-owned hospitals, and an increase in the percentage of physician ownership in existing physician-owned hospitals. Any reduction of the physician-owned hospital limitation would be welcomed news in the physician community. Further, in an effort to curb costs, the proposal also includes provisions that would promulgate a nationwide bundled payment program. Upon analyzing these proposals, many stakeholders believe that the circulation of the discussion draft indicates the direction of the anticipated Medicare debate in Congress and expect several of these provisions to be at the forefront of discussions in the next congressional session.

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On October 17, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) extended its interim final rule regarding fraud and abuse waivers for accountable care organizations (ACOs) that participate in the Medicare Shared Savings Program. The Medicare Shared Savings Program was one of the initial steps taken under the Affordable Care Act to both increase quality and lower costs in the Medicare program. ACOs that participate in the Medicare Shared Savings Program can share in the savings generated to Medicare.

Originally, the interim final rule was published in the November 2, 2011 Federal Register, and had the typical three-year period before becoming a final rule. The continuation of the interim final rule extends the timeline for an additional year, establishing a new deadline of November 2, 2015. The interim final rule offers five waivers to ACOs, which allow healthcare entities to form and operate ACOs without fear of violating federal fraud and abuse laws. The ACO waivers include:

  • An ACO participation waiver;
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    Since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, much of the media focus has been on individuals who were previously denied coverage because of preexisting conditions or financial barriers. Now, studies are focusing on the large group of individuals who, prior to the ACA, simply chose not to purchase health insurance. The reports demonstrate that due to the Individual Mandate portion of the ACA, which requires individuals to purchase health insurance, many more individuals are choosing to participate in their employers’ health plans.

    The increased participation in employer health plans will inevitably cost employers. Most recently, Wal-Mart announced that a dramatic increase in employees signing up for insurance through the company will cost its stockholders $500 million — up from the company’s previous estimate of $330 million. Although Wal-Mart is experiencing the employer-based insurance shift on a large scale, many employers nationwide are expected to see a jump in participation in their health plans. Recently, the National Business Group on Health announced that large employers should expect to see a 6.5% rise in healthcare costs in 2015.

    Although The New England Journal of Medicine and members of the Urban Institute both note a rise in individuals signing up for insurance through their employers, other analysts predict that employers’ costs will be too high, and that the employers will simply “dump” these employees into their state’s health insurance marketplace. Many experts, however, expect that if such dumping were to occur, it would come from small employers who merely cannot afford to offer adequate health plans.